Weisler MD

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is a clinical research study?

 

Clinical studies (also called clinical trials or research protocols) are conducted to test whether a new drug or treatment approach is safe and effective in people.  Trials are also conducted with existing drugs to assess whether they may be useful for another treatment. Every medicine must go through the clinical research study process. It is the only way a medicine can be approved for use.

 

Who runs a clinical research study?

 

A 'sponsor' pays for a clinical research study. A sponsor may be a drug company, a private organization, or a government agency. These different groups often work together to discover new and better medicines.

 

Why are clinical research studies conducted?

 

Every medicine must go through careful testing to see if it works and that it works safely. It is the only way a medicine can be approved for use.

 

Why should I participate in a clinical research study?

 

People choose to volunteer for a clinical research study because volunteers often receive access to the latest investigational medicine, regular study-related check-ups, health information, and the chance to improve medicine.

 

How do doctors and researchers test whether a medicine works?

 

Researchers compare an investigational medicine to an already approved medicine or a placebo. Placebo is often referred to as a 'sugar pill.' A placebo has no active ingredients, is not made of sugar, and its ingredients have no nutritional value. As a volunteer, you will not know whether you are receiving the medicine being tested or the placebo.

 

Will I know which medicine I will get in a clinical research study?

 

As a volunteer, you will not know whether you are receiving the medicine being tested or the placebo.

 

What should I expect?

 

Before entering into a clinical trial, it is important for you to have as much information as possible about the study, procedures and medications in order for you to make an informed decision about whether or not to participate. To assist you in this process, the study physician and research staff will discuss all of the potential risks and benefits of the study as well as your right to voluntarily discontinue participation at any time for any reason.

 

What will be expected of me?

 

As a clinical research study participant, you will be asked to go to study visits at Dr. Weisler's office, take your study medication as scheduled, fill out forms, and talk with your research team about how you are feeling.

 

Am I right for a study?

 

It is important that clinical research studies include all kinds of people. Every clinical research study is different because every investigational medicine is different.

 

 

 

COPYRIGHT © 2010 Richard H. Weisler, M.D., P.A. All Rights Reserved.